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The 3rd Annual Arts & Sciences Fair- Beirut

SHAPE YOUR FUTURE WITH AN LAU SCHOLARSHIP! 

LAU Beirut will be holding its third annual Arts & Sciences Fair for secondary level students (grades 10 & 11). 

Place: LAU Beirut Campus 
Date: Friday, April 22, 2016

Meetings & Deadlines:
Thursday, November 19, 2015: Preliminary meeting to discuss the event and answer questions. The meeting will be held in the Adnan Kassar School of Business building, room 903, from 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, November 17, 2015: Deadline to confirm your attendance to the preliminary meeting.
Monday, December 14, 2015: Deadline to submit writing application (short story, essay, poetry)
Monday, January 11, 2016: Deadline to submit all other applications.

N.B. The location and timings of the competitions on the day of the fair will be announced at a later time. 

Looking forward to seeing you all there,

Arts and Sciences Fair Committee

Science Competitions

1. Physics Knowledge

Team Requirements:
One team composed of three students per school may participate. The team should be composed of one 10th grade student and two 11th grade students.

Competition Information:
The contest will be a list of several multiple choice questions (either 4 or 5 options each). The questions will be projected on a large screen and will be changed every 1-3 minutes. They will be asked in both French and English. Teams will go through an elimination process until the last remaining team wins.

Additional Round (only for the top three schools):
Once the winning teams have been chosen, the top three schools will be selected to compete in a bonus round. Each team member will now have to compete individually to determine the top ranking student in each school. This round will only be used to help decide on a potential scholarship winner if the winning school is also the School of the Year award recipient..

Topics:
Students should prepare by studying the physics program of the Lebanese Government for the 1st and 2nd Secondary classes along with the following topics.

  • Mechanics
  • Optics and waves
  • Electricity and magnetism
  • Physics general knowledge (history of physics, famous physicists etc.)

Sample Questions:
A basketball is launched with an initial speed of 8.5 m/s and follows the trajectory shown. The ball enters the basket 0.92 s after it is launched. What are the distances x and y?

  • x = 6.0 m, y = 0.88 m                                                                                       
  • x = 5.4 m, y = 0.73 m
  • x = 5.7 m, y = 0.91 m
  • x = 7.6 m, y = 1.1 m
  • x = 6.3 m, y = 0.96 m 

The Nobel Prize in Physics 1921 was awarded to Albert Einstein “for his services to Theoretical Physics, and especially for his discovery of…”

  • E=mc2
  • Photoelectric effect 
  • Special relativity
  • General relativity
  • The Big Bang 

Materials: 
Students are asked to bring their own scientific calculators (programmable calculators are not allowed) and a writing tool. These are the only materials permitted for use during the competition.

N.B.
Teachers will be prohibited from entering the room while students partake in the competition and students will be prohibited from using their cellular phones in any manner. Any violations will lead to the disqualification of the entire team.

2. General Chemistry

Team Requirements:
One team composed of three students per school may participate. The team should be composed of one 10th grade student and two 11th grade students.

Competition Information:
The contest will be a list of several multiple choice questions (either 4 or 5 options each). The questions will be projected on a large screen and will be changed every 1-3 minutes. They will be asked in both French and English. Teams will go through an elimination process until the last remaining team wins.

Additional Round (only for the top three schools):
Once the winning teams have been chosen, the top three schools will be selected to compete in a bonus round. Each team member will now have to compete individually to determine the top ranking student in each school. This round will only be used to help decide on a potential scholarship winner if the winning school is also the School of the Year award recipient. 

Topics:
Students should prepare by studying the chemistry program of the Lebanese Government for the 1st and 2nd Secondary classes along with the following topics:

  • Basic concepts of matter
  • Atomic structure
  • Structure of compounds: ionic and molecular
  • Chemical reactions and aqueous solutions (reaction stoichiometry, basic calculations of mass, molarity, density, number of atoms)
  • Acids and bases
  • Elemental analysis
  • Oxidation/reduction reactions (balancing redox reactions and volumetric analysis of redox reactions)

Sample Questions:
Gold is a precious metal that is chemically unreactive. It is very important for jewelry, dentistry and electronic devices. A small piece of gold is called an ingot. For example, an ingot of mass 301g has a volume of 15.6 cm3. Calculate the density of the ingot.

  • 4695 g/ml
  • 19.3 x103 g/ml
  • 19.3 g/cm3
  • 4.695 x103 g/cm3
  • None of the above

A compound of sulfur and oxygen is 40.1% sulfur by mass. What is the empirical formula for the compound? (The atomic weight of S and O are 32.07 and 16.00 respectively)

  • SO
  • SO4
  • SO2
  • S2O3
  • SO3

Give the chemical symbol of the element oxidized and reduced (if any) in the equation below 
4KClO3(s) a 3KClO4(s) + KCl(s)

  • The element oxidized is Cl and the element reduced is Cl.
  • The element oxidized is O and the element reduced is Cl.
  • The element oxidized is Cl and the element reduced is O.
  • The element oxidized is K and the element reduced is Cl.
  • The element oxidized is K and the element reduced is O.

Materials:
Students are asked to bring their own scientific calculators (programmable calculators are not allowed) and a writing tool. These are the only materials permitted for use during the competition.

N.B.
Teachers will be prohibited from entering the room while students partake in the competition and students will be prohibited from using their cellular phones in any manner. Any violations will lead to the disqualification of the entire team.

3. Fiber, Prebiotics and Probiotics: A Healthy Tri

Team Requirements: 
One team composed of three students per school may participate. The team should be composed of only 11th grade students.

Competition Information:
The contest will be a list of several multiple choice questions (either 4 or 5 options each). The questions will be projected on a large screen and will be changed every 1-3 minutes. They will be asked in both French and English. Teams will go through an elimination process until the last remaining team wins.

Additional Round (only for the top three schools):
Once the winning teams have been chosen, the top three schools will be selected to compete in a bonus round. Each team member will now have to compete individually to determine the top ranking student in each school. This round will only be used to help decide on a potential scholarship winner if the winning school is also the School of the Year award recipient. 

Topics:
Students should prepare by studying from the attachments and the following link:  
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2006.02963.x/epdf

N.B.
Teachers will be prohibited from entering the room while students partake in the competition and students will be prohibited from using their cellular phones in any manner. Any violations will lead to the disqualification of the entire team.

3. Lebanese Sandwiches with a Twist

Team Requirements:
One team composed of three students per school may participate. The team should be composed of a combination of 10th and 11th grade students.

Competition Information:
Students must create a healthier version of two hot Lebanese sandwiches (ex: falafel, shawarma, shishtaouk etc.). The sandwiches may be prepared at home or on campus. Along with creating these sandwiches, the team must prepare a visual display such as a brochure or poster to explain the health value of the sandwiches.

Materials:
Students are asked to bring their ready made sandwiches or ingredients with them (enough to feed several students) ,on the day of the fair Friday,April 22, 2016, along with the brochures, posters or visual aids that were created explaining the health value of the sandwiches.  

N.B.
The microwave provided will be a standard size. Failure to follow all competition guidelines, such as preparing anything that is not a hot sandwich, will lead to the disqualification of the entire team. 

4. Website Development

Team Requirements:
One team composed of one to two students per school may participate.

Competition Information:
Students will have to develop a website that is both interactive and dynamic and should include a database for saving and retrieving information. It should also include features such as uploading documents, downloading files, video playing, message sending, searching, user profile updates, login and more. The use of already developed templates is strictly prohibited, the template must be originally designed and developed. Competitors should have the entire configuration needed for their projects ready on their laptops or personal sites. Teams will be given 10 minutes on the day of the fair Friday, April 22, 2016. to present the features on their laptops and answer jury questions. Technical questions related to coding might be asked during or after the presentation.

Materials:
Students are asked to bring their own laptops to be able to present their websites.

Evaluation Criteria:

  • Clear user interface
  • Interaction with users
  • Provided features
  • Underlying technology used
  • Website efficiency and performance

N.B.
Failure to follow all competition guidelines will lead to the disqualification of the entire team.

5. Mobile Application 

Team Requirements:
One team composed of one to two students per school may participate.

Competition Information:
Students will have to develop an advanced educational mobile application (ex: game, problem solving technique, etc.) in any subject they desire (ex: English, Math, etc.).The application should be both interactive and dynamic and should include a database for saving and retrieving information. It may also include features such as internet connection, browsing, video playing, messaging, searching, login, user profile updates, involving several players/students either locally or over the network and more. The use of API’s and libraries is allowed, but the features of the application must be developed from scratch. Teams will be given 10 minutes on the day of the fair to present the features on their smartphone/projector and answer jury questions. Technical questions related to coding might be asked during or after the presentation, so the source code on your laptops must be available. Students will be asked to come and display their work on the day of the fair on Friday, April 22, 2016.

Materials:
Students are asked to have the entire configuration/tools/cables needed for their projects ready on their smart phones and prepared to be connected to the projector.

Evaluation Criteria:

  • Interface and design
  • Interaction with users
  • Provided features
  • Idea innovation
  • Educational relevance
  • Underlying technology used
  • Efficiency and performance

N.B.
Failure to follow all competition guidelines will lead to the disqualification of the entire team.

6. Probability Project – Design your own Game 

Team Requirements:
One team composed of no more than 3 students per school may participate. The team should consist of only 11th grade students. 

Competition Information:
Students will be designing their own unique game, like those played at a carnival, amusement park, or casino. Students must also be able to properly explain the probability related to winning their game. Students will display their work on the day of the fair on Friday, April 22, 2016.

Final Product:

  1. Game: Bring all necessary game materials (board game, playing pieces, cards, dice, etc.)
  2. Instructions: Create a set of easy to follow instructions that clearly explain the game.
  3. Poster (Size A1 or A2):
    • Name of  the game
    • Game description
    • Instructions
    • Probability analysis: Show the mathematical calculations for the expected value of winning the game. Is the game fair? If not, how can it be changed to become fair?
  4. Prizes: Bring in some prizes such as candy for students who might play and win during the Arts and Sciences fair.

Evaluation Criteria:

  • Probability analysis
  • Game and game description
  • Instructions created
  • Neatness and organization

N.B.
Failure to follow all competition guidelines will lead to the disqualification of the entire team.

Art, Language, and Social Sciences Competitions

1. Short Story

Participation Requirements:
Each school can send two participants, one student per language (English or Arabic).

Competition Information:

The participant will write a short story in the language of his/her choice. (Please indicate your language of choice on the application form). The topic to write about will be provided to the students during the contest. Short stories should range between 1000-1500 words.

The contest will take place on Saturday, January 23, 2016 from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Nicol Hall rooms 208 and 209. Finalists will be notified in April through their respective schools and will be invited to attend the award ceremony on Friday, April 22, 2016.

Materials:
Students are asked to bring their own pens and pencils and LAU shall provide the scratch and contest papers.

Sample Topics:
Please use some sample topic questions from previous years as a guide, but note that this year’s topics may be broader and more general.

  • It is often said that you should never judge another person until you walk in his or her shoes. Tell about an experience that enabled you to better understand another person
  • Unexpected turn of event
  • Travel experience - imaginative or real – inside or outside Lebanon

2. Essay

Participation Requirements:
Each school can send two participants, one student per language (English or Arabic).

Competition Information:
The participant will write an essay in the language of his/her choice. (Please indicate your language of choice on the application form). The topic to write about will be provided to the students during the contest. Essays are not to exceed 1000 words.

The contest will take place on Saturday, January 23, 2016 from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Nicol Hall rooms 210 and 211. Finalists will be notified in April through their respective schools and will be invited to attend the award ceremony on Friday, April 22, 2016.

Materials:
Students are asked to bring their own pens and pencils and LAU shall provide the scratch and contest papers.

Sample Topics:
Please use some sample topic questions from previous years as a guide, but note that this year’s topics may be broader and more general.

  • Technology has transformed our lives, particularly the way we interact and communicate. Compare social interaction now with what it was in your parents’ generation.
  • We keep witnessing changes around us, often at a very rapid pace. The way our grandparents grew up was significantly different from the way we live. Imagine the future. How do you envision life to be 100 years from now?
  • If you look around you, you will notice that people dress in very different styles. To what extent, in your opinion, do clothes make people? Do clothes make a significant statement about who we are?

​3. Poetry 

Participation Requirements:
Each school can send two participants, one student per language (English or Arabic).

Competition Information:
The participant will write a poem in the language of his/her choice. (Please indicate your language of choice on the application form). The topic to write about will be provided to the students during the contest. Poems may be of any type or length.

The contest will take place on Saturday, January 23, 2016 from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Nicol Hall rooms 219 and 220. Finalists will be notified in April through their respective schools and will be invited to attend the award ceremony on Friday, April 22, 2016.

Materials:
Students are asked to bring their own pens and pencils and LAU shall provide the scratch and contest papers.

4. Ling-o-mania 

Participation Requirements:
Only one 10th or 11th grade student representative per school may participate. A maximum of 30 schools can participate in this competition, so send in your applications early.

Competition Information:
Students will compete in an online vocabulary and spelling competition based on the American spelling of words. The competition will be composed of several True/False and multiple choice questions. The student who receives the highest score within the allotted time wins. The questions will be based on the meaning and/or spelling of the top 200 words and word families of the Academic Word List http://www.englishvocabularyexercises.com/AWL/.  Applicants must submit both their names and email addresses (through the online application form) so that they may be added to the online class ‘Ling-o-mania’ where they can learn, practice, get tips, and communicate with other competitors.

5. Express Yourselves

Participation Requirements:
Only one 10th or 11th grade student representative per school may participate. A maximum of 25 schools can participate in this competition, so send in your applications early.

Competition Information:
Students who want to participate in this competition must prepare a 3-5 minute persuasive speech on one of the topics listed below. The speech has to be in English and must follow one of the organizational patterns identified by the committee. A workshop will be held earlier to provide participants with guidelines for the speech preparation. All participants should attend the workshop in order to learn the appropriate speech format and the necessary skills needed to use the powers of language and rhetoric as they present their viewpoints. Students will need to depend on their own individual powers of expression and will not use any audiovisual support. They must rely on their own oratory skills as the sole means of communicating their message.

Organizational Strategies:
Speeches should be organized using one of the following strategies:

  1. Problem-Solution or
  2. Cause-Effect

Topics (select one):

  • How is technology affecting our inter-personal communication?
  • In this modern era of globalization, why is it important to preserve our traditions and identity?
  • How can we encourage the youths today to read for pleasure?

Workshop (required):
A workshop will be held on Saturday, April 2, 2016 in Nicol 208, from 10:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. This will give participating students the required guidelines on how to prepare their speech. It will focus on persuasive strategies, emotional appeals, introductions/conclusions, transitions/organization, and language use as a means of reinforcing ideas and creating an audience-centered speech. A section on speech delivery will also be part of the mandatory workshop.

Materials:
Students must rely on their own verbal skills and may not use additional presentation aids. This promises to make the competition even more challenging.

Evaluation Criteria:
A panel of judges will listen to all speeches and grade each participant according to provided guidelines. These guidelines will be given to each participating student during the workshop for additional transparency.

6. Philosophy

Team Requirements:
One team composed of three students per school may participate. The team can be composed of any combination of 10th and 11th grade students who are good at reasoning.

Competition Information:
The contest will consist of two phases.

  • The first phase will involve finding fallacies. During the competition, various media selections (e.g. written paragraphs, newspaper clippings, video dialogues) will be projected on a large screen and changed every 3-10 minutes. The selections will be in English. Teams will increase their score by finding the correct fallacy from multiple choice options or noting that there is no fallacy in the piece.
  • In the second phase the same process is repeated but this time with the goal of finding the correct argument form. The schools will be given a set of valid argument forms to prepare with. Then various selections will be projected and students will have to determine the form of the argument presented. As with the first phase, different options will appear on screen to choose from.

All teams will play simultaneously and points will be assigned accordingly. The points from both phases will be tallied and the team with the most points wins.

Additional Round (only for the top three schools):
Once the winning teams have been chosen, the top three schools will be selected to compete in a bonus round. Each team member will now have to compete individually, even against their own original teammates. This will determine the top ranking student from each school. This round will only be used to help decide on a potential scholarship winner if the winning school is also the School of the Year award recipient. 

Workshop (required):
A workshop will be held on Saturday, March 5, 2016 in Nicol 210 from 12:00 p.m. until 2:00 p.m. This will give participating students a chance to become better acquainted with the idea of fallacies and argument extraction. A list of reasoning fallacies and examples on how to detect fallacies will be covered.

Materials:
Students can bring in sheets and pens/pencils with them. These are the only materials permitted for use during the competition.

7. Community Survey and Service

Team Requirements:
One team composed of four students per school may participate. The team should be a combination of 10th and 11th grade students.

Competition Information:
Students must identify a community or neighborhood that is underprivileged. They will briefly include some statistics regarding the community including its name, geographic location with bordering neighborhoods, population size, types of residence, businesses, enterprises, shops and so on. Students will then interview key figures in the community such as municipality representatives/mukhtars, clergy/religious people, civil society representatives (NGOs), business representatives/ merchants and the residents (around 20 to 25 people). Several questions will have to be addressed, such as:

  1. What are four of the major social problems (examples:  health, housing, crime, drug, education, unemployment, street gangs, poverty etc…) that the community is suffering from?
  2. Which groups of people are suffering most from these problems: children, families, youth, adults, or elderly?
  3. What specific sections of the community are affected by these problems?
  4. What types of social services are available in the community (number of NGO’s, government offices, UN organizations)?

Students will be required to film their interviews (after obtaining the required approval) along with the social circumstances that are prevalent in the chosen community to better highlight their social problems. They will then have to come up with one or more services needed by the community to alleviate or solve these problems. They will propose a creative solution that is realistic and can be implemented. Students will be asked to come and display their work on the day of the fair on Friday, April 22, 2016 in a 5-10 minute presentation in either English or Arabic. The entire project can also be carried out in either English or Arabic. Students should be prepared to answer any questions posed by the judges.

Methods of Presentation:

  • Poster format presentation
  • PowerPoint presentation that includes:
    1. Statistical tables with figures for the previous questions
    2. Sample interviews
    3. Videos of the social circumstances of the community
    4. Maps
    5. A qualitative analysis

Materials:
Students are asked to bring all the visual material needed for their presentations including their own laptops.

N.B.
Failure to follow all competition guidelines will lead to the disqualification of the entire team.

8. Film Making

Team Requirements:
Two teams composed of three students per school may participate. The team can be composed of any combination of 10th and 11th grade students.

Competition Information:
Students must create a 0.5 to 2 minute (end credits included) creative video in any genre. The film can be in either English or Arabic. If the film is in Arabic, an English plot summary must be submitted along with the film. Students should upload the film on Youtube and send the link to Ms. Christina Bouri no later than Monday, April 11, 2016. They must then come screen their films on campus on Friday, April 22, 2016.

N.B.
Failure to follow all competition guidelines, including exceeding the 2 minute time frame, will lead to the disqualification of the entire team.

General Information

No project will be accepted if the application form is not submitted on time. Punctuality is of the utmost importance so that we have the necessary time needed to plan a successful event. Your cooperation and understanding are appreciated.

All awards will be presented on Friday, April 22, 2016 after the completion of the performances. We expect that all school representatives be available on the aforementioned date to receive any prizes. The prizes will include

  • A participation certificate for each student
  • A participation memorabilia for each school
  • Medals for all winners (1st, 2nd, and 3rd place)
  • One ‘School of the Year’ award for Arts (presented to the school that gathers the most points in each art category. Therefore, the more competitions participated in, the better chances are for winning)
  • One ‘School of the Year’ award for Sciences (presented to the school that gathers the most points in each science category. Therefore, the more competitions participated in, the better chances are for winning)
  • One 50% Scholarship awarded to a student from the ‘School of the Year’ in Arts
  • One 50% Scholarship awarded to a student from the ‘School of the Year’ in Sciences

Your students’ participation is instrumental for the success of this annual event. Please encourage them to participate.

Raed A. Mohsen, Ph.D. Christina Bouri  Samer Habre, Ph.D.
Dean of Students Senior Assistant Coordinator of Academic Advising Assistant Dean, School of Arts and Sciences
LAU Beirut Campus Committee Coordinator Committee Chair

Important Dates

  

  

  Application Deadline Competition Day  Workshop  Project Deadline  Awards Ceremony
Physics Knowledge  Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016     Friday, April 22nd, 2016
General Chemistry  Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016     Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Fiber, Prebiotics and Probiotics: A Healthy Trio Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016     Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Lebanese Sandwiches with a Twist Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016     Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Website Development  Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016     Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Mobile Application Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016     Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Probability Project – Design your own Game  Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016     Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Short Story  Monday, December 14th, 2015 Saturday, January 23rd, 2016                   
11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.                              
Nicol Hall rooms 208 and 209
    Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Essay  Monday, December 14th, 2015 Saturday, January 23rd, 2016     
11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.                             
Nicol Hall rooms 210 and 211
    Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Poetry  Monday, December 14th, 2015 Saturday, January 23rd, 2016                  
11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.                                               
Nicol Hall rooms 219 and 220
    Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Ling-o-mania   Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016     Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Express Yourselves Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016 Saturday, April 2nd, 2016          
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.                        
Nicol 208
  Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Philosophy   Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016 Saturday, March 5th, 2016                           
12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
  Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Nicol 210
Community Survey and Service   Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016     Friday, April 22nd, 2016
Film Making  Monday, January 11th, 2016 Friday, April 22nd, 2016   Monday, April 11th, 2016                             Friday, April 22nd, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact us

Beirut: 
Riman Jurdak
Office of the Dean of Students 
Ext: 1101

Byblos: 
Alan Kairouz
Office of the Dean of Students 
Ext: 2536

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